Economics of Pierce’s Disease

Economics of Pierce’s Disease 

The project team includes economists and biological scientists from other countries and other UC campuses, as well as UC Davis.

Julian Alston
Kate Fuller
Jennifer S. James
Mark Hoddle
Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes
Phil Pardey 
Bob Sutherst
Andrew Walker

OVERVIEW 
Pierce’s Disease (Xylella fastidiosa), a bacterial plant pathogen, was first recognized in California in 1892. This disease affects grapevines by restricting the water flow in the xylem, and as a result, eventually kills them. In recent years, a new non-native vector, the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter (Homalodisca coagulata), has emerged to create an increased threat because of its ability to fly long distances, reproduce rapidly, and live longer than other native sharpshooters, which also spread the disease. It is thus evident that this pest and the disease it carries pose current and very large potential economic threats to the California wine industry.  In this project, we will integrate economic and biological modeling techniques to address economic questions related to Pierce’s disease. The interplay between the biophysical and economic components of the model will be structured to allow us to simulate market outcomes under alternative scenarios for the prevalence of Pierce’s disease, and alternative technologies and policies for its management, and to assess the economic consequences of these alternatives for various stakeholder groups. The model will be designed specifically with a view to using it to evaluate the likely expected benefits from investments in alternative R&D projects related to the management of Pierce’s disease.

PROJECT FUNDING
The project is partially supported by grants from the Pierce’s Disease/Glassy Winged Sharpshooter (PD/GWSS) Board and the Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics

LINKS

Pierce’s Disease/Glassy Winged Sharpshooter (PD/GWSS) Board

Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics

Pierce’s disease research makes gains, much more ahead.   
UC ANR, January 9, 2002

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